Saturday, October 20, 2018

Completed my midnight black Tamiya Hornet

As I may have mentioned, I have been building a Tamiya Hornet RC buggy as a way of procrastinating starting the rigging of the Wingnut Wings Fokker. I'm still waiting on a controller and receiver to arrive in the mail from a Chinese seller on ebay (six weeks and counting...) but apart from that the Hornet is complete.


I've decided to leave it midnight black, and not put all the bright stickers on it. I think it looks much more striking like this. I may revise that idea once it starts to get scratched up once driven, but for now those pristine glossy black panels are just too nice to cover up with gaudy graphics.



It also highlights just how beaten up my Sand Scorcher is now!





I'm particularly happy with how the driver figure turned out.




Cheers,

Dave

Thursday, October 18, 2018

New video: The 3 simplest ways to improve your scale modelling skills

I had a moment this week when I was sanding away at a poorly fitting join, and I thought just how much I don't enjoy sanding models. After a little more thought, I decided that sanding and cleaning my airbrush were my two least-favourite parts of the hobby. A little more thought again and I realised that the day I confronted these two least-favourite parts of building was actually a really powerful and simple way I improved my builds.




In light of this, my latest video discusses three really simple ways to improve your builds. These are low-hanging fruit - relatively obvious things, but nonetheless important ways to improve your modelling skills, and like the example above they are powerful and simple tools for improving your abilities, no matter if you are an absolute newbie or if you've been modelling for years.

I hope that the title of this video doesn't feel too "clickbait-y". I promise it's not meant to be!

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
The three simplest ways to improve your scale model builds

If you have any feedback, or if you have any other suggestions for simple ways to improve builds, please comment below.

Cheers,

Dave



Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Painting another 1/10 scale driver figure


I'm building my second RC buggy, the Tamiya Hornet. Why am I building that at the moment, I hear you ask, and breaking my own rule of not building two projects at once? Because I'm procrastinating over tackling all the fiddly, mind-numbingly intricate rigging and cutting out teeny tiny turnbuckles for the Wingnut Wings Fokker...


As part of the build, I've got another 1/10 scale driver figure to paint (previous Sand Scorcher driver is here). It's satisfying to paint these little guys, for two reasons:

  1. they're a lot larger than the 1/35 scale figures I usually paint
  2. it's weirdly satisfying to paint these well, even though it is usually barely visible inside the vehicle. I don't know why.


So I'm painting the Hornet driver's eyes, and dammit: one eye is perfect, and one eye looks like a randomly applied blob of paint. The eyes are always the hardest part of a face to paint, and I got it 50% spot on and 50% nope, not quite.

Tamiya Hornet driver figure
Hmmm, that eye on the right hand side of the photo is a bit sketchy...

Tamiya Hornet driver figure

Tamiya Hornet driver figure

Tamiya Hornet driver figure
Pictured: the good eye.

Tamiya Hornet driver figure


I'll see what I can do to fix this...

Cheers,

Dave


Friday, October 12, 2018

New 10% Discount retailer for The MOD Squad members - SJS Hobbies

Good news! I've got a new retailer on board for my members-only discounts programme, The MOD Squad! SJS Hobbies is an Australian ebay retailer who specialises in model kits, hobby supplies and model upgrades, and they have agreed to offer 10% off to all MOD Squad members.


Woo hoo!


If you haven't considered The MOD Squad yet, it's a good time to check it out. For a modest monthly contribution you receive 10% off normal prices at a growing range of scale model specialist retailers. Basically, if you spend more than $30 a month on modelling then you come out ahead, plus you get to support Dave's Model Workshop in the process. Win/win!

If you are already a member, then check out my Patreon page where you will find a special members-only post which contains a link to the ongoing 10% off prices at SJS Hobbies. I hope you find some good stuff there!

If there are any other retailers you'd like to see become part of the 10% off programme, please let me know and I'll approach them. I'm all about bringing some value to you guys, the more the better :)

Cheers,

Dave

Monday, October 8, 2018

The problem of recasting

I don't often post other people's videos on my blog, but when I find something important or extraordinary, I will happily make an exception. This is one of those cases. Adam Savage - one of the guys from Mythbusters - is a model nerd. Who knew, eh? And he has released a video this week about the problem of recasting, where an unscrupulous person will buy a limited release kit and use it to cast their own moulds and then sell their knock-off versions.





I discovered this video via an email I received from Industria Mechanika. If you haven't checked them out before, you should - I got into their aesthetic when I was scratchbuilding The Seahorse, they do great sci-fi and steampunk resin kits. And they are exactly one of the sort of small, short-run model producers who are impacted by recasting. They put in all the effort, pay the artists, produce the amazing kits, and pay their way in the industry.

When someone else comes along and directly copies their work and then starts flogging it off much cheaper on eBay or Etsy or Aliexpress, it may be tempting to grab yourself a bargain. I'll be honest - I've knowingly purchased a recasting before. I'm not proud of it, but I have.


Finding these dodgy bastards took literally sixty seconds.
Part of me didn't want to give exposure, but the main offenders need to be shown.


When Adam says in his video that there are problems with the recasting, that the quality is never as good, I have some doubts. I'm sure some are piss-poor, but I'm sure others are pretty much indistinguishable from the legitimate originals.

But the important difference is this: if you buy originals, you support the artists who produce the cool thing that you love and want. You keep them in business. This equals you keep them producing more cool stuff in the future. You win long term.

That dude who knocks it off and flogs it cheap? He's not designing anything cool for release next month or next year. Screw him. Plus, it's just a really shitty thing to do, being a parasite and copying the creativity of others.

If you've ever read this blog before you'll know I love saving money, and doing it on the cheap if it is at all possible. But in this case, it's a false economy. Support the people who actually do the work - your purchase keeps the small guys producing the cool stuff. If they go out of business then less cool stuff for you in the future.

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Adam Savage on The Problem of Recasting

Cheers comrades,

Dave



Friday, October 5, 2018

New video: How to paint a realistic WW1 wooden propeller

The Wingnut Wings Fokker continues, and in my latest video I show you how I've painted the laminated wooden propeller. I've taken a little artistic license here - technically it should be something like seven layers thick, not three, but you get the idea. It looks good to me, and it looks like real wood.



How to paint realistic laminated wooden propellers for WW1 aircraft scale models


It's a very simple technique. Basically it involves a base layer of lightish acrylic paint, and then a further layer of darker raw umber acrylic.

The magic happens when you cover that with washes of burnt umber oil paint. This gives the wood its richness and tonal variation.


How to paint realistic laminated wooden propellers for WW1 aircraft scale models

How to paint realistic laminated wooden propellers for WW1 aircraft scale models


What I love about this technique is that it is incredibly forgiving. If you stuff something up, it is tremendously easy to wipe it away and have another go, and another go, until it looks good to you.

The video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
How to paint realistic wooden propellers for WW1 aircraft

Cheers,

Dave





Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Painting my wooden propeller

I can't keep it in - I'm pretty damn chuffed with how this is working out so far. Here's the current progress on painting the wood effect of my Fokker's propeller.



Painting a wood effect on scale model aircraft propellers


I'm rather happy with that.

My partner asked if the kit comes with an actual wooden propeller when she saw this.

Not bad for a bit of plastic, eh?

Painting a wood effect on scale model aircraft propellers

Painting a wood effect on scale model aircraft propellers


I'm currently filming a how-to video on how I achieved this, which I hoe to have out this weekend.

Stay tuned!

Cheers,

Dave

Friday, September 28, 2018

New video: Wingnut Wings are they really that good? PART 3 FINAL BUILD

The Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV Eindecker is almost complete. I still have to finish painting the propeller and then rig all the rigging, two topics which I will cover in separate "how to" videos, but as far as finishing everything that is included in the kit - it is 95% complete. As such, I feel ready to answer my question of "Wingnut Wings - are they really that good?"



1/32 scale Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV completed model


In this third and final video in the series, I discuss the final construction of the kit, the fit of the subassemblies, and the quality of the Cartograf decals. I could have masked and airbrushed most of the German cross markings, they are not that complicated, but I wanted to experience the entire Wingnut Wings kit and everything it offered.

In addition to the prop and rigging, I've still got some weathering and a final matte coat to go.

1/32 scale Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV completed model
But overall I'm tremendously happy with how it has turned out.


So what is my verdict?

Are Wingnut Wings scale model kits as good as everyone says?

Are they worth the hefty price tags?



You'll just have to watch the video to find out.

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they really that good? Part 3 FINAL

Cheers,

Dave


Thursday, September 20, 2018

What the Postie delivered: I think I have an addiction

This arrived in the post today. I think I have a problem.


Tamiya Racing Buggy buggy Champ 1/10 scale silver edition
Oooh, bonus parts included!

It's a 1/10 scale Tamiya Super Champ, the re-release of the original 1970s SRB Rough Rider.

I'll just add it to the RC Hornet that arrived a week or two ago.

Tamiya Racing Buggy buggy Champ 1/10 scale silver edition


So, ummm, just asking on behalf of a friend: when do you know you have a new addiction?

That damn Tamiya Sand Scorcher - it's a gateway drug.

Dave

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Painting the turned aluminium effect of the Fokker's cowling

I spent a couple of hours last night working on the Wingnut Wings Fokker, and in particular I worked on the turned aluminium cowling. I have two words to describe this process: time-consuming.


These period photos show the effect I'm trying to replicate. It's a squiggly, curvy snaking line of polished turned aluminium that covers the entire cowling and exposed aluminium surfaces at the front of the aircraft.

Source.
Source.

Source.


And here is my attempt at capturing this look so far:







I'm going to produce a video very soon showing how I achieved this effect, but all I will share right now is that it involves a lot of time, a good set of eyes, bright light and a lot of patience!

Cheers,

Dave

Saturday, September 15, 2018

New video: Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV - PART 2

My experiment with Wingnut Wings continues in this second video about the 1/32 Fokker E.IV, and I have to say, I like this little Fokker. In this video I build the engine and fuselage.





The detail continues to impress. The radial engine in particular is a miniature work of art - the detail is just phenomenal. Below you can see photos of the 160hp Oberursel U.III engine. There are some issues with seams, which I think are fairly unavoidable. I don't know, perhaps there would have been a smarter way to manufacture those pieces and avoid visible seams on the piston casings on the finished product, but I don't have any suggestions on exactly what that smarter solution would actually be.

1/32 scale Radial engine from Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV
This engine is 28mm from side to side. That's a helluva lot of detail packed into 28mm.
1/32 scale Radial engine from Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV
Why yes, that is obviously a 160hp Oberursel E.III radial engine!
Pfft, who wouldn't recognise the ol' E.III from just a glance?


The fuselage is another story. I do spend a lot of time in this video dealing with seams on the fuselage (some issues are due to my own incompetence!) but I do present a solution in the video on how some of these issues could have been avoided.

That said, as I mention in the video: Who am I to tell Wingnut Wings how to manufacture their kits? I'm just some schlub.

Anyway, check it out. I'm really enjoying this build - it continues to be really eye-opening for me. Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they really that good? PART 2


Special thanks to HobbyLink Japan who provided the kit to me for review - if you like the look of the kit it is available here.

Cheers,

Dave




Friday, September 14, 2018

Two years of Dave's Model Workshop

I just realised that Dave's Model Workshop is now two years old! Hooray!




I uploaded my first video to YouTube on 12 September 2016. I think you'll all agree we've come a long way since then...

Thanks for coming along for the ride, and stick around for much more to come. You guys are the best.

Dave


Thursday, September 13, 2018

What the postie delivered today: A Tamiya RC Hornet

It was a good day in the Dave's Model Workshop household. A fresh delivery by the Postie! And what have we here? Another ridiculous, juvenile radio control buggy kit! A Tamiya Hornet!



Oooh! Oooh! Oooh!


I distinctly remember in the 1980s being rather dismissive of the Hornet. I remember pooh-poohing it - it's a cheap, entry-level kit, and it's nothing special. But I rather suspect I was wrong, in that special know-it-all way that 12 year olds specialise in. Having done a little research as an adult, the Hornet is an amazing get-the-maximum-bang-for-your-buck RC kit. From what I can glean online, it's fast, cheap, reliably bulletproof, and (most importantly) fun.

This is the perfect companion to my Sand Scorcher.

You two are going to have such adventures together!


So... ummm... asking for a friend: when does a healthy interest turn into an addiction?

Cheers,

Dave

Friday, September 7, 2018

New video: Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they really that good?

In recent years there has been a lot of hype around Wingnut Wings kits. I've seen them winning again and again at scale model competitions, and I've heard a lot online about how detailed and how amazing these expensive kits are. So I finally took the plunge and started one. Does it live up to the hype? Are Wingnut Wings worth it?


Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they worth it?



Before we begin I have to set the record straight on a couple of things:


  • My views are based on a sample size of one. This is the first WNW kit I've built. So my views on all Wingnut Wings kits as a whole probably aren't terribly statistically sound!
  • At this stage I'm only about 20-25% into the build.
  • Full disclosure - this kit was provided to me gratis by HobbyLink Japan (their website is here) to review. There has been no editorial influencing, no pressure to review the kit one way or the other, but I felt in the interests of honesty I had to disclose that up front.


So, with that out of the way, what is the kit like?


Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they worth it?

The kit: Wingnut Wings 1/32 scale Fokker E.IV


It. Is. Detailed.

So, so detailed.

I had been planning to build this quite quickly, to do it as a refresher away from what I usually build (I haven't built a WWI aircraft model in about 20 years!). But the kit is so detailed, so intricate, that you really can't rush it. To do so would not be doing justice to the engineering of the kit, to the potential of the kit.

I was all set to be quite skeptical of the hype. Surely one kit is much the same as another, right? But I have to admit that this Wingnut Wings kit is pretty special. The plastic is very forgiving - even when separating the finest, flimsiest pieces from the sprue, it doesn't shatter or snap. The instructions are an absolute joy, with a phenomenal range of references. The fit is pretty amazing.The engineering is just clever.

All that said though, there are some down sides. I won't give too much away here, you'll have to watch the video, but it's not all breathless fanboying from me here. There are compromises, and there are moments when the incredible detail is just too much - sometimes it feels like gilding the lily.

So what are you waiting for? Watch the video now! And if you like the look of it, you can purchase the kit here from HobbyLink Japan.

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Wingnut Wings scale model kits - are they really that good?


Cheers,

Dave



Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Back in business - building the Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV

It's good to be over the ghastly busy period at my work. And I'm building again! I've made a solid start on the Wingnut Wings 1/32 Fokker E.IV, and I'll have a new video out about it in the next day or two.



The Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV
The Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV


So does an expensive Wingnut Wings kit live up to the hype?

Let's just say this: it's pretty extraordinary. There is good and bad, but it's an extraordinary experience.

The Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV
That little chair is a work of art in itself.


The Wingnut Wings Fokker E.IV
The cockpit comes together. Detail, detail, detail!


Video will follow soon with all of my thoughts.

Cheers,

Dave

Saturday, August 25, 2018

So what the bloody hell happened this month, eh?

Oh, it's been a rough month. I've not put out a new video in almost three weeks, and I always try to put out a new video for my audience every single weekend. This is pretty poor form, especially for you guys who are members of The MOD Squad and help to financially support Dave's Model Workshop.


Today I've put out a video explaining just what the hell happened in August. It's not looking for sympathy, it's just an explanation and so that you know that I haven't forgotten you.



The worst of it is over, and it'll get better from here. I promise.

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
What the bloody hell happened this month to Dave's Model Workshop?

Cheers,

Dave


Thursday, August 16, 2018

Another brutal work week

I'm having another brutally busy week at work this week, just like last week. I'm getting up at 5am, racing to work by 6am, and putting in long days. In the evenings I have no energy left for building models or filming videos. Bugger...


I don't think I'm going to get a video out this week, for which I apologise in advance. As you know, I release a new video every Friday so that you guys all have something new each weekend. But this week it's just not going to happen. Sorry.

I'll make it up to you somehow!

Cheers,

Dave

Sunday, August 12, 2018

New video: Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action on sand, mud and dirt

I've been a bit quiet lately, as I've been flat out at work (horror week, don't ask...) - so first up sorry for the radio silence from this end. In the very little spare time I've had, I have been playing with running the Sand Scorcher, and it has been a lot of ridiculously juvenile fun.


I've had it on a beach, on sand in its natural environment.

Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action on sand, mud and dirt


I've belted it through muddy puddles.

Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action on sand, mud and dirt


And I've spun many, many circles in dusty dirt.

Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action on sand, mud and dirt



It's been a helluva lot of fun!

Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action on sand, mud and dirt


Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Tamiya Sand Scorcher in action - on sand, mud and dirt

Cheers,

Dave


Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Having a rough week

This whole "real world full time work" thing really gets in the way of modelling time. 


This week I'd love to get out there on a beach and run the Sand Scorcher. Or make a start on my next model, a WingNut Wings WWI Fokker monoplane.

Instead, it is currently 10pm on a Tuesday and I am working on real, full-time paid work stuff.

Poo.





How do you guys manage to make time for modelling? Got any tips on how to make the real world of earning money take up less of your time?

Cheers,

Dave