Saturday, February 17, 2018

10,000 subscribers on YouTube

Today I clocked up a new milestone - 10,000 subscribers on YouTube!


To all of you who follow me on the Toobz - thank you. The feedback I get from you all makes it worth it.

10000 youtube subscribers


You guys rock.

If you're not already subscribed to my YouTube channel, what are you waiting for? Become #10,001 by clicking here and hitting my "Subscribe" button.

Here's to many, many more videos!

Dave


Thursday, February 15, 2018

Big news is coming...

I can't reveal it just yet, but I've been working away here behind the scenes on a very interesting idea.


Cool stuff is happening


It's something that hasn't been done before in the scale modelling hobby.

And it should directly benefit you, my audience.

Stay tuned...

Cheers,

Dave

Monday, February 12, 2018

New video: How to paint and weather tools for scale model tanks and armor

I've just completed another collaboration with Panzermeister36 on Youtube - definitely check out his channel if you haven't previously - and this time we each did a video on how to paint and weather tools on scale model tanks. A lot of modellers are intimidated by all those bits and pieces mounted to the hulls of tanks: shovels, sledgehammers, jacks, jacking blocks, gun cleaning rods, axes and wire cutters. But with a little research and a couple of basic techniques, you can tackle any of these.


How to paint and weather tools on scale model tanks and armor


The techniques are pretty simple, it's really just a matter of following a set pattern. In fact, I found myself repeating again and again as I filmed this video, "It's nothing special..."

How to paint and weather tools on scale model tanks and armor
The end result.


So if you've ever felt stumped by all those tools clipped to your Panther, your Tiger, your T-34 or your Sherman, check out my video below, and then have a look and see what Panzermeister also came up with. I'm interested to see his take on the subject as well.

My video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work, here is the link:
How to paint and weather tools for scale model tanks and armor.


Cheers,

Dave



Friday, February 9, 2018

Weathering and "black basing" paint with an insane Soviet jet seaplane monstrosity

A while back I found these images on English Russia (www.englishrussia.com) and I filed them away as potential weathering references. It is a ridiculous oversized, brutal and impractical Soviet jet seaplane, and surely that is reason enough to like this blog post. Aha, but I have more for you, dear reader! Let's talk about black basing and panel lines.



Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting







Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting



The ridiculous plane itself - KM Ekranoplan


This insane vehicle is the KM Ekranoplan, otherwise known as the "Caspian Sea Monster", which is as good a name as I ever saw for such a monstrosity. It was designed and tested in the mid-1960s. If you want to read more about it, check out its wikipedia page - there is also some old footage of it in flight:



I don't know about you, but I instantly like any aircraft where the closing line of its wikipedia entry states "The vehicle was too heavy to recover from its watery wreck site". Yay, Soviet Union!


So how does this relate to scale models?


I'm glad you asked. Originally, I saved these images as weathering references. This is a great example of an aircraft that hasn't moved since 1980, so almost forty years of sun and rain and snow have taken their toll.

But what really interests me is how this real item looks like a model that was black based.

For those who don't know, black basing is where a modeller paints a black base coat, and then successive random squiggles of lighter colour, before painting the final (fairly thin) coat of top paint. The idea is to give suitably random variation in the tone of the paint.  For a full explanation of the technique, I can't do better than point you to this page on Doog's Models, another modelling blog.


Black basing scale models
The random blotchiness of black basing.
Source: Doog's Models. Link.


Lately I have seen some online discussion criticising pre-shading, black basing and the "Spanish School" of painting. Some modellers* believe that these painting styles are unrealistic, not true to scale, and the panel lines become too pronounced.

All I will say is: check out the pronounced panel lines on the Caspian Sea Monster. Check out the random blotchiness.


Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting


Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting

Soviet Ekranplan jet seaplane weathering reference for scale model painting


Anyway, all discussion about shaded panel lines aside, I love these photos. I love how utterly crazy this plane is, and I love how it looks now after almost forty years exposure.

Making models really does change the way you view the world.

Cheers,

Dave

_____________________________________________________________________________


* There will always be some modellers who bitch and moan about everything. You can't please everyone. Build what makes you happy, and say "up yours" to the minority who like to rivet count.

Sunday, February 4, 2018

When do Models become Art?

If you've followed my blog or my YouTube channel for any length of time, you'd know that I don't just show pics of my latest work and prattle about tools. There's more to modelling than that. Today I want to discuss the topic of "When do Models become Art?" because I recently visited a collectables store which had lots of gorgeous aircraft models for sale, and they were most definitely not just mere models - they had somehow become Art.



When do models become Art?


I know discussing Art is a tricky business. Yes, yes, it's all in the eye of the beholder, Art is whatever the artist says it is, etc etc ad infinitem. There is a lot of wank about Art out there, and I am certainly:

  1. no expert, and;
  2. unwilling to go down that rabbit hole.


But I do know that some models somehow transcend being simply models and become something else. Collectables, objets d'art, home decor, call them what you will, there are some times when models are coveted by non-modelling people. How does this happen?

This came about because I visited a collectables store last weekend, Smith Street Bazaar in Collingwood here in Melbourne, and I noticed their range of stunning aircraft art models. This got me thinking...

When do models become Art?

When do models become Art?

When do models become Art?


I have produced a video discussing this, showing what I think are legitimate "Art Models" (yes, I just made up that term and now I'm running with it) and offering some opinions on how this occurs and why, but I'd love to have a discussion and hear your opinion on the matter. Why so many aircraft, while it seems tanks don't get to become "Art Models"? Do they have to be made of precious metals? Why is no artist attributed? So many questions.

Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
When do Models become Art?

I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Cheers,

Dave




Saturday, January 27, 2018

New video: Scale model scratch build science fiction - Part 4

It's been a while between updates on The Seahorse, my scratch built sci-fi anti-gravity ship. Partly this was due to my overseas trip, and partly it was due to a lack of motivation - I lost momentum for a while there on the interminably slow hull build. But I'm back in the saddle!


1/35 scale scratch built sci-fi scale model the Seahorse


Previous progress videos for The Seahorse are as follows:
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

So this time I've finally moved on from the hull, and have tackled the deck surface and started building the superstructure. It's a relief to have moved on to the more interesting parts, as well as parts which don't need to be glued to the oily plastic of the soft drink bottle.

sci-fi scratch built scale model the Seahorse
Although it doesn't look it, this is a big improvement on the original decking I attempted!

sci-fi scratch built scale model the Seahorse
Cutting curved corners in styrene is always a tad tricky...

sci-fi scratch built scale model the Seahorse
The cabin starts to take rudimentary shape.


Video is embedded below, but in case that doesn't work here is the link:
Progress on scratch building my sci-fi scale model - Part 4

Cheers,

Dave

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Terribly clever: How to model spinning wheel hubs on a scale model rally car

I was wasting time on Facebook (as one does) and I spotted the below images in a scale modelling group. It is a diorama of an Audi Quattro rally car belting along a dirt road, kicking up clouds of dust. It's a great diorama, the dust is well done, the dirt road is realistic, and the car is well weathered. But what really caught my eye was the spinning wheels of the car - they are incredible!


The diorama is by a European modeller named Matthiéu Noire, who specialises in automotive models. He has a Facebook page showcasing his models under the name Blackscale18 - https://www.facebook.com/blackscale18/ - if you're into car models, I recommend checking it out.

Matthiéu explained that the spinning wheel effect was achieved by taking an existing photo of the real car in action, zooming in on the spinning wheel hub, and then printing that onto a circle of card and gluing that on the hubs of the scale model.

So it went from this, the original kit pieces:

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car


To this effect, showing a rally car in motion:

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car

How to model spinning wheel hubs in motion on a scale model rally car

Such an ingenious idea! I don't think I would ever have thought of that. This is my favourite kind of modelling: so simple, so cost effective, and so easy - I love it. Rather than messing around with expensive aftermarket solutions, this shows with a little ingenuity most modelling problems can be solved. And the end result is an absolute show-stopper of a diorama. (Oh, and great photography as well!)

Nice work Matthiéu, and thank you for agreeing to let me share your brilliance on my blog.

Cheers,

Dave


Thursday, January 18, 2018

Reader's build: "Avenging Vulture" scratch build by HG Barnes

I always love it when readers of my blog get in touch to share their work with me. It's great to see what other people are doing and follow the progress. Today I've got a special scratch build by a reader to share with you all: the "Avenging Vulture" by HG Barnes from Alberta, Canada.


HG said he was inspired by my sci-fi scratch build to do one of his own. Embarrassingly for me, he will be finished his way, way before I finish mine!


Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes


The basis of HG's ship is a kit of an Italian bomber from WW2. I couldn't guess which it was when he showed me one of the early pics - ten Dave's Model Workshop bonus points to anyone else out there who can guess what it was! ;)

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes


I'm loving the shape that this has taken. It looks suitably predatory and purposeful - it reminds me a bit of a Ju-88 Stuka, all harsh angles and brutal lines. I like how menacing it is. There's also a bit of a Klingon Bird of Prey feel in there too. Nice.

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes


Preshading and basecoat painting has been finished, and HG is now at the stage of applying decals and commencing weathering.

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes

Avenging Vulture scratch built sci-fi ship by HG Barnes


I'm also enjoying spotting pieces from various kits: the rear engine deck cover from a T-34, and various tank track pieces in the old bomb bay.

A big thank you to HG for allowing me to share this with you all, I love your work mate and I'm looking forward to seeing how this one finishes.

If anyone else wants to share progress pics, please just get in touch. I always enjoy seeing them and featuring them on the blog if you're happy for me to do so.

Cheers,

Dave